Junctions

Note: The lettering of these trail junctions is arbitrary. These are not official designations, and you won’t find them on any published map, but they are useful for referring to locations.

For some of these junctions, waypoints are provided on Motion-X (they were created in the Motion-X GPS HD app on my iPad) and Dropbox. Motion-X says that the links expire after six months, though so far none of mine have expired. Since the Dropbox links depend upon my filing hierarchy, they may become inactive.

Some information updated 2014-08-11.


Jct A: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Granite Chief Trail (15E23)


Granite Chief Trail - Pacific Crest Trail sign
At the junction of the Granite Chief Trail (15E23) and Pacific Crest Trail (2000). This sign is new 2013.


Jct B: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Squaw Valley Trail


There is a sign post at the junction of the Pacific Crest Trail and the “Squaw Valley Trail” (this is not an official name). This junction is just south of the Granite Chief saddle. The “Squaw Valley Trail” heads east towards Watson Monument, and connects with the eastern branch of the Tevis Cup Trail. As of 2013, this sign is deteriorating badly and difficult to read on all sides.


Jct C: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Tevis Cup Trail (16E04)


    

There are two sign posts at the junction of the Pacific Crest Trail and the Tevis Cup Trail. The names Tevis Cup and Western States are used interchangably on several maps, and I’ve chosen to call the northern branch the Tevis Cup Trail, and the southern branch the Western States Trail. This junction is south of the Granite Chief saddle. From the junction, the Tevis Cup Trail heads west to the Tevis Cup Trailhead, and east to Watson Monument.


Jct D: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Western States Trail


GCW PCT - Tevis Alt sign

A sign at this junction indicates the Tevis Trail departs northwest. The names Tevis Cup and Western States are used interchangably on several maps, and I’ve chosen to call the northern branch the Tevis Cup Trail, and the southern branch the Western States Trail, so this should be the Western States Trail rather then the Tevis Trail. On the other hand, some maps designate trail 16E10 down Picayune Valley as the Western States Trail. A ways down the trail there is an old WS Trail metal sign on a large tree.


Jct E: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Whiskey Creek Trail (16E02)


There are two signs at the junction of the Pacific Crest Trail (2000) and the Whiskey Creek Trail (16E02). This junction is between the Western State Trail junction and the Five Lake Trail junction. From the junction, the Whiskey Creek Trail heads west to Whiskey Creek Camp.

Pacific Crest Trail - Whiskey Creek Trail jct

Note: for the PCT, mounted on a post; as of 2014-08-06, this sign is missing


Jct F: Pacific Crest Trail (2000) & Squaw Saddle Trail (16E27)


GCW PCT - Squaw Saddle sign

A single sign on post marks this trail junction, pointing along the Squaw Saddle Trail towards Five Lakes. The Pacific Crest Trail is not noted other than the PCT logo on the sign post, which is confusing. Look to the PCT logos a short ways down the northbound and southbound PCT trail for confirmation about your trail.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct G: Pacific Crest Trail & Tahoe Rim Trail


A vertical post marks this trail junction, with destinations on all four sides. To the south, the PCT and TRT coincide. To the north is the PCT, and to the west is the TRT.


Jct H: Five Lakes Trail (16E13) & Squaw Saddle Trail (16E27)


At this junction, the Squaw Saddle Trail (which goes to the PCT trail) is marked by a sign to the PCT and Whiskey Creek Camp, while the Five Lakes Trail (which goes to the main lake of the Five Lakes) is marked by a sign to Five Lakes.

Between this junction and the junction with the PCT, there is a junction with an old, unmaintaned trail that comes from Five Lakes, currently unsigned though there is still a signpost there.

Just before the Five Lakes Trail reaches the largest of the Five Lakes, there is a destination sign.

 

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct I: Powderhorn Trail (15E15) & Five Lake Creek Trail (15E31) & Hell Hole “Trail” (15E17)


GCW Diamond Crossing
Three trails come together at this junction, the Powderhorn Trail, the Five Lake Creek Trail, and the Hell Hole “trail” which is only partly maintained. The junction is in an open meadow. It has never been clear to me whether the name “Diamond Crossing” refers to this trail junction, or to the point where the Hell Hole trail crosses Five Lakes Creek.
Note: As of 2014-08-07, this sign is on the ground.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct J: Five Lake Creek Trail (15E31) & Bear Pen Trail (16E26)


At this junction, the Bear Pen Trail leaves the Five Lakes Creek Trail heading east.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct K: Five Lakes Creek Trail (15E31) & Big Spring Trail (16E17) SOUTH


At this junction, Five Lakes Creek Trail heads west to cross Five Lakes Creek, and the Big Spring Trail heads north to Big Spring and Big Spring Meadow.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct L: Five Lake Creek Trail (15E31) & Shanks Cove Trail



At this junction, Five Lakes Creek Trail heads north, and the Shanks Cove Trail heads west. This sign is in error, as it implies a trail direction that doesn’t exist. When viewing the sign, the Five Lakes Creek Trail to Diamond Crossing is behind you, not to the left.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct M: Five Lake Creek Trail (15E31) & Big Spring Trail (16E17) NORTH


At this junction, Five Lakes Creek Trail heads north, and the Big Spring Trail heads east to cross Five Lakes Creek.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct N: Five Lake Creek Trail (15E31) & Whiskey Creek Trail (16E02) & Picayune Valley Trail (16E10) at Whiskey Creek Camp




At this junction at Whiskey Creek Camp, Five Lakes Creek Trail enters from the south, Picayune Valley Trail enters from the west, and Whiskey Creek Trail enters from the north. Both signs area mounted on a post at the trail junction.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct O: Picayune Valley Trail & Shanks Cove Trail

Shanks Cove sign
At this junction at Shanks Cove Trail departs left to the ridge above Grayhorse Valley, and thence down to Shanks Cove, and the Picayune Valley trail departs right. New sign as of 2011 (note misspelling of Picayune). There is no sign for the Picayune Valley Trail heading towards Whiskey Creek Camp.


Jct P: Shanks Cove Trail & Grayhorse Valley Trail


At this junction, the Shanks Cove Trail continues down into Shanks Cove to the east or north towards Picayune Valley, while the Grayhorse Valley Trail heads west to the Grayhorse Valley Trailhead. There is some uncertainty about the naming of these trails, and the change of direction of the Shanks Cove Trail seems odd, but this is the best sense I can make of the naming.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct Q: Buckskin “route” (15E16) and Hell Hole “trail” (15E17) EAST


There is no trail sign, and essentially no indicator of this trail junction. At a dry meadow just to the west of Buckskin Creek, there is a single, out-of-place rock in the meadow which marks the departure of this very-hard-to-follow trail. See the description of the Buckskin Trail for more information.

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct R: Buckskin “route” (15E16) and Hell Hole “trail/route” (15E17/15E18) WEST


There is no trail sign, and essentially no indicator of this trail junction. Rather than the junction location just east of Steamboat Creek, the junction is actually west of Steamboat Creek. The only evidence is a large Incense Cedar with the trail blaze on the side facing the trail, and two nails in the tree. See the description of the Buckskin Trail for more information. This may be the point at which the Hell Hole “trail” (15E17) changes to the Hell Hole “route” (15E18).

Motion-X | Dropbox


Jct S: Hell Hole “route” (15E18) & McKinstry “trail” (15E02)


There is no trail sign, and essentially no indicator of this trail junction. The trail from the “trailhead” on the jeep road continues east and terminates at the reservoir shore. The Hell Hole Trail heads uphill from a location that is not marked other than with a few obscure small cairns. At the McKinstry Trailhead, there is a sign, but the distance are completely inaccurate.

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